12 Tips On How To Protect Baby From The Sun in Baby Carrier

Keeping a baby-wearing toddler safe from the sun is easier than thinking of ways of how to protect baby from the sun in baby carrier.

With toddlers, you can use sunscreen and the usual protection like hats. 

But with babies, it can be different, especially with newborns. 

It’s not recommended to use sunscreen on them, they might hate wearing hats, and how to protect their limbs from the hot sun?

And how do you and your baby stay cool in the baby carrier? What are the usual baby-wearing tips for summer?

These are the usual questions new parents always have. Which will be answered in this article.

I have researched various ways on how to protect your baby from the sun in the baby carrier. Most of these tips came from veteran parents from popular, trusted online groups so you know you’re getting quality, sensible advice.

Let’s get started.

How To Protect Baby From The Sun in Baby Carrier

Here are some tips and tricks on how you and your baby can stay cool in a baby carrier during the summer:

Choose the best baby carrier for the summer

Half the “heat battle” is won if you’re using the right baby carrier. One that’s light, breathable and airy. 

Look for the best baby carrier for hot weather right here.

Most baby carriers come also with a baby hood, which you can use to further protect your baby from the sun.

Dress appropriately

Think light and airy.

100% cotton, bamboo clothes, or those made of linen are the best to wear. 

Especially linen, as it absorbs and releases moisture. This means your and your baby’s clothes will stay dry even if you’re both sweating.

Sporty performance fabrics are also recommended to wear if that’s your style.

Stay in the shade

We all go to the park, go hiking, go to Disney, and go to some fair that’s set up under the hot summer sun.

And sometimes an obvious, most practical advice, like staying out of the direct sunlight, doesn’t seem doable at the moment.

But you can hack it by maybe changing your schedule.

So instead of visiting the park or going hiking in the middle of the day, why not try early in the morning. 

Or around 5 pm, when the sun is not that hot.

Or choose an activity indoors, or where there are plenty of trees, natural shade, and covers for protection

Use/ wear some sun protection

What I did before is to always bring an umbrella. Or parasol, if you prefer to call it that way.

And a bucket hat with a strap for my kid. (You can also try a flap hat or sun hat/ summer hat.)

Which mine hates to wear, so an umbrella was my best bet in protecting my baby from the sun in a baby carrier.

If you don’t like to carry one, why not use a brimmed hat, one that’s large enough to provide shade for both you and your baby.

Or a UV protection muslin or sun blanket, large enough to cover even their arms and legs.

If you’re not going to walk around and just sit down and chill with your baby by the park or the beach, use a pop-up tent, beach umbrella, or those outdoor playpens with shade.

Add in some sunglasses (or babiators, as they call them) if your baby can tolerate it.

And some sun protection pants, if needed.

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate

Keep cool by making your baby (and you!) drink plenty of water or milk.

Keep your water bottle within reach by putting it in the side pocket of your diaper bag.

Or stop every 20 minutes or so, under a shaded area preferably, and just let your little one have a drink.

More Summer Babywearing Tips & Tricks

Use sunscreen for 6 months+

Newborns and babies under 6 months old are not recommended to wear sunscreen, according to the FDA and AAP.

But for older babies, it should be fine to use sunscreen.

Pediatricians and dermatologists recommend using physical or mineral sunscreens (those with titanium dioxide or zinc oxide) with young children and anyone with dry skin or eczema.

Older kids at the back

If your kid is large and old enough and your baby carriers allow a back carry, put them at your back!

It will be much cooler for both of you.

Keep things less sticky

It can be pretty icky in the baby carrier when you’re both sweating and you’re front carrying your baby.

Use a light muslin blanket or a burp cloth between you and your baby to make things less icky and sweaty for both of you.

Squirt some water

Carry a small squirt or mist bottle filled with water and just spritz some on you and your baby’s face. 

Use fans

Manual, traditional fans, or small, cute, handheld, battery-operated fans – it doesn’t really matter.

As long as there’s air to keep you and your baby cool and less sweaty from the hot weather.

Take a break

If your little one is already hot, fussy and nothing seems to work, take a break from babywearing.

Set them down on a stroller if you have one with you.

Let your spouse carry them. Or just put them in your arms and settle them down.

Don’t cover your baby’s face

Especially newborns. Make sure that their airways are clear and nothing is covering their mouth and nose. 

FAQ on How To Protect Baby From The Sun in Baby Carrier

Can a baby get too hot in a baby carrier?

Yes, babies, especially newborns can get too hot or overheat in a baby carrier.
So always check on your little ones and look out for overheating symptoms, when baby wearing them.

How do I keep my baby cool in a carrier?

Wearing one layer of clothing can help your baby stay cool in a carrier. 
But the most important thing to protect your baby from the sun in the carrier is to keep them hydrated and avoid the midday sun.

What should a baby wear when it’s hot?

Just one layer of clothing would do. 
Get baby clothes made from 100% cotton or bamboo or linen material. 
These types are the most breathable, airy, most comfortable materials your baby can wear when in the baby carrier.

Takeaway on How To Protect Baby From The Sun in Baby Carrier

Manage your expectations about babywearing out in the sun.

You can do every bit of baby carrier sun protection for your baby but the sun can be brutal. 

So the best advice on how to protect your baby from the sun in the baby carrier is simple – stay out of the sun if you can, especially at midday.

Time your outings when babywearing. Do it when it’s not too hot or when you know there will be plenty of shade.

And make your baby drink a lot of water or milk and take breaks!